Change in Law Opens Doors for WMH
Change in Law Opens Doors for WMH

Change in Law Opens Doors for WMH

Hospital

people standing behind seated GovernorWyandot Memorial Hospital President and CEO Ty Shaull was one of four Ohio hospital leaders that joined state legislators in Governor Mike DeWine’s signing of House Bill 222 this week. The law specifies that a nonprofit formed or acquired by a county hospital or joint township district hospital is a separate entity from the hospital. Shaull said he had the opportunity to thank Governor DeWine after the ceremony and share how this change can benefit health services in Wyandot County and surrounding areas.

A new law in Ohio opens the door for Wyandot Memorial Hospital to form and partner with other entities – something that most other hospitals in Ohio could already do.

WMH President and CEO Ty Shaull and three other Ohio hospital leaders joined Ohio Governor Mike DeWine for his signing of House Bill 222 enabling joint township hospitals and county hospitals to partner with or own a non-profit organization.

The legislation amends sections 339.10 and 513.172 of the Ohio Revised Code to specify that a nonprofit formed or acquired by a county hospital or joint township district hospital is a separate entity from the hospital. Previously, hospitals like Wyandot were restricted from some ventures due to the original code sections drafted in the 1950s that created county and joint township district hospitals. The revision to the statute gives county and joint township district hospitals the ability to form and partner with other entities.

“As an independent hospital in a rural area, collaboration among local agencies and organizations is key to the well-being of our community,” Shaull emphasized. “Removing the restrictions supports our mission and tradition of caring for those in Wyandot County and surrounding areas.”

Shaull was one of several hospital leaders submitting written testimony in support of H.B. 222, which was sponsored in the House by Shane Wilkin (R) and Terrence Upchurch (D). Local Representative Riordan T. McClain was among the legislation’s cosponsors.

The MetroHealth System in Cleveland was the public hospital that spearheaded the effort to introduce the legislation, and one of their staff first reached out to Shaull for input last year. He reported the hospital’s Board of Governors and leadership team have been monitoring its progress.

“Now that we are over this hurdle, we will be examining opportunities for the advancement of health services in our community,” Shaull noted.

He explained that Wyandot Memorial’s acquisition last year of the struggling Health Services of Wyandot County is a good example of how this change can help organizations. Because of the previous restrictions, WMH was not permitted to partner with Health Services, but rather forced to acquire the local home health and hospice agency. The law now permits such partnerships and the entities involved have more flexibility in their structure.

“I was honored to be invited to participate in the signing at the Statehouse,” Shaull added. “I’m confident this change will benefit many now and in the years to come.”

Wyandot Memorial Hospital is a joint township district hospital consisting of Crane, Mifflin, Pitt and Salem Townships. The trustees of those townships appoint the members of the hospital board of governors responsible for operations.